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The late Edwin Hubbard was a nimble musical prodigy whose chosen instrument of expression was the flute.

Hubbard disdained the terms flutist or flautist, preferring to call himself a "flute picker." He was a flamboyant but beloved Memphis jazz standout whose facility with the sax as well as the flute tagged him as “about the most in-demand musician in his field’. He is heard on iconic recordings by Elvis Presley and Isaac Hayes, among others.

As a musician, Hubbard was an adventurer, said to be the first to bring about a fusion of bluegrass and jazz, and later, what he called the "Afro-Billy sound," a fusion of African, jazz, and bluegrass.

Early in his career, an Indian gave him a clutch of beautiful eagle feathers, saying, “They will give your music strength.” Hubbard dangled them from the end of his flute with a long string and was never again seen without them.

On March 22, 1997, the 61-year-old Hubbard auditioned for the role of conductor of the Germantown (TN) Symphony Orchestra. After conducting Mozart's Requiem (a.k.a. The Funeral Mass), he went to his dressing room, where the concertmaster found him dead from an apparent heart attack.

Accompanied by some of Memphis' finest - Tom Lonardo on drums, Errol Thomas on bass, and Marvell Thomas on keyboards – Edwin Hubbard’s legacy lives on in this album entitled “Skyway Sunday”.

 

 


   
 

THE SHRAG

SHORTNIN’ BREAD

MEMPHIS BLUES

IT HAD TO BE YOU

BRAZIL

TICO TICO

AMAZING GRACE

   

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